Prevention and Cessation

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We have launched campaigns in cities and states across the nation to prevent stores from selling tobacco products to people under age 21.  Already passed in California, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, and Oregon, and hundreds of cities, this change promises to make it less likely that children become addicted to tobacco products.

Overall, our work to reduce tobacco use has led to funding for highly successful quitlines and youth programs that educate children about the perils of using tobacco, including cigarettes, hookah and e-cigarettes. 

Together, these programs and our Tobacco 21 campaign will help prevent children from starting a deadly tobacco addiction and help more adults quit. 

Smoking rates are at their lowest levels in decades, with 8 percent of high school kids and 15.5 percent of adults smoking cigarettes.

Take Action

Photo of Tobacco Products

Oppose efforts to weaken government oversight of tobacco products

Ask Congress to oppose efforts to weaken the FDA's oversight authority over all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, cigars and hookahs.

Latest Updates

August 9, 2018

State lawmakers across the country are missing important opportunities to pass and implement proven legislative solutions to prevent and fight cancer, according to a report released today by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN). How Do You Measure Up?: A Progress Report on State Legislative Activity to Reduce Cancer Incidence and Mortality grades states on the strength of evidence-based policies that help to prevent cancer, which kills roughly 1,670 people a day nationwide, forces patients to pay nearly $4 billion in out-of-pocket expenses every year and in 2015 cost the country more than $80 billion in direct medical expenditures.

August 9, 2018
Indiana

Indiana falls short when it comes to implementing policies and passing legislation to reduce cancer incidence and death from tobacco use, according to the latest edition of “How Do You Measure Up?: A Progress Report on State Legislative Activity to Reduce Cancer Incidence and Mortality.” The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network released the report today.

July 23, 2018
Minnesota

State Rep. Dario Anselmo of Edina was awarded the Minnesota Distinguished Advocacy Award, a prestigious honor bestowed by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) in recognition of his hard work to promote strong public health policies that reduce the burden of cancer in Minnesota. ACS CAN, the

July 2, 2018

In the last few weeks nine states have worked to pass bills that restrict local lawmakers’ ability to pass future innovative and proactive public health policies. These bills are known as “preemption bills” because they block, or preempt, authority of lower levels of government to pass laws stronger than state law. Preemption bills are popular among groups like the tobacco industry to prevent future legislation that could impact the sale of its products. The following is a Statement from Christopher W. Hansen, President of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN).

Prevention and Cessation Resources

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) supports raising the minimum age for sale of all tobacco products to age 21 with strong retailer compliance and active enforcement as part of its comprehensive strategy to reduce youth initiation.

In 2014, 32 percent of Medicaid enrollees were smokers, compared with 17 percent of the general population. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., with more than 480,000 deaths each year caused by cigarette smoking.

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., with more than 480,000 deaths each year caused by cigarette smoking.