Colorectal Cancer

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The science is clear. If Americans received regular screenings for colorectal cancer, thousands of deaths could be prevented each year. But, for too many Americans, the screenings either aren't fully covered by their health insurance or aren’t affordable due to high out-of-pocket costs. 

The 80% by 2018 campaign strives to pass state and federal laws that remove the barriers preventing people from getting colonoscopies and other lifesaving colorectal cancer screenings. 

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. for men and women combined.

Take Action

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Close the loophole resulting in big colonoscopy bills for Medicare patients

Under Medicare, there should be no co-pay for a colonoscopy. But, if the doctor removes a polyp, you can wake up to a big bill. Ask Congress to end the loophole that allows this surprise charge.

Latest Updates

January 5, 2018
South Carolina

Columbia, SC – December 11, 2017 – Senator Thomas Alexander was awarded the National Award for Distinguished State Leadership, a prestigious honor bestowed by the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable which was co-founded by the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and is a

November 15, 2017
Maryland

Easton Doctor of Nursing and American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network Ambassador Receives Abeloff Award for Excellence in Public Health and Cancer Control from Maryland Department of Health Dr. Michele Williams has received the 2017 Martin D. Abeloff Award for Excellence in Public Health and Cancer Control from the

November 10, 2017
Nebraska

ACS CAN advocate's letter featured in Grand Island Independent.

November 10, 2017
Nebraska

ACS CAN advocate's letter featured in the North Platte Telegram.

Colorectal Cancer Resources

This factsheet discusses the value of screening and how it saves lives. Unfortunately, seniors on Medicare currently are responsible for a 20% coinsurance if a polyp is detected and removed during a screening colonoscopy.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women, the second leading cause of death in men, and the third leading cause of death in women in the United States.