Health Care Delivery

ACS CAN supports the continued implementation of provisions in the Affordable Care Act that help cancer patients and their families and provides materials for consumers, cancer patients and cancer survivors who want to learn more about the law or their health insurance options.

Featured Resources

 

Health Plan Worksheet: Know Your Coverage and Costs

Health Care Delivery Resources:

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) helps individuals with limited incomes afford their health care coverage by
providing cost-sharing subsidies (like deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments) for silver-level plans
purchased on the health insurance marketplaces. Currently, Congress and the administration are
debating whether to continue funding these cost-sharing reduction subsidies (CSRs). If CSR subsidy
funding is discontinued, health care costs could increase for all marketplace enrollees – regardless of
whether the enrollee qualifies for the CSRs.

Numerous provisions of H.R. 1628, the American Health Care Act (AHCA), would adversely impact access to adequate and affordable health insurance coverage for cancer patients and survivors.

On April 25, 2017, the text of an amendment to the American Health Care Act (AHCA) to be offered by Representative MacArthur (R-NJ) was released.  The amendment could undo several key protections that are critical for cancer patients and survivors – including the prohibition on pre-existing condition exclusions.

As Congress debates enacting changes to the health care market, one concept re-emerging is state high-risk pools to provide health insurance coverage for individuals who otherwise cannot obtain or afford coverage. High risk pools are not a new concept. Prior to the enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) many states operated some form of high risk pool. During implementation of the ACA, a federal high risk pool was established as an interim step to the new marketplaces. The overall success of high risk pools varied. This fact sheet examines how state risk pools work and the impact on persons with cancer and cancer survivors.

The current health care law has several provisions that help ensure children with cancer have access to quality treatment and care, and that survivors of childhood cancer are able to obtain and maintain affordable health insurance.  These provisions and protections are essential in any health coverage system that intends to provide meaningful care for pediatric cancer patients and survivors.

Much of the public debate regarding health care reform concerns government-funded health insurance like Medicaid and exchanges, but changing health care laws will also affect the health insurance many Americans get through their employers.  Therefore, any changes to current law must not make it harder for cancer patients and survivors to obtain, afford or use their job-based health insurance.

Current federal requirements prohibit health insurance plans from denying coverage to individuals with pre-existing conditions like cancer.  These are one of several important patient protections that must be part of any health care system that works for cancer patients.

Current federal law has several provisions that help prevent individuals and families from experiencing gaps in their health insurance coverage.  Coverage gaps can delay necessary care, which is particularly detrimental to cancer patients and survivors.  Preventing gaps in coverage is a crucial patient protection that must be maintained in our health care and insurance system.

Current federal law provides life-saving coverage of cancer prevention and early detection services and programs.  These provisions are crucial to reducing the incidence and impact of cancer in the United States.  They are also crucial in helping cancer survivors remain cancer-free and lead healthy lives.