Health Care Delivery

ACS CAN supports the continued implementation of provisions in the Affordable Care Act that help cancer patients and their families and provides materials for consumers, cancer patients and cancer survivors who want to learn more about the law or their health insurance options.

Featured Resources

 

Health Plan Worksheet: Know Your Coverage and Costs

Tips for Choosing Health Insurance

Health Care Delivery Resources:

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) helps individuals with limited incomes afford their health care coverage by
providing cost-sharing subsidies (like deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments) for silver-level plans
purchased on the health insurance marketplaces. Currently, Congress and the administration are
debating whether to continue funding these cost-sharing reduction subsidies (CSRs). If CSR subsidy
funding is discontinued, health care costs could increase for all marketplace enrollees – regardless of
whether the enrollee qualifies for the CSRs.

This report explores the experiences of cancer patients with their health insurance and financial challenges through interviews with hospital-based financial navigators. The report finds that while the Affordable Care Act has brought crucial improvements to patient access to health insurance, cancer patients still face serious challenges affording their care and using their insurance benefits.

Section 1332 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allows states to apply for waivers to experiment with different ways of providing and paying for health care.  These waivers are often referred to as “Section 1332 waivers,” or “state innovation waivers.”  It is important for the cancer community to fully understand how Section 1332 waivers could impact cancer patients and survivors

Congressional efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act have included additional funding in an effort to stabilize state individual insurance markets.  The funding level proposed is inadequate, as discussed in more detail in this backgrounder.

Numerous provisions of H.R. 1628, the American Health Care Act (AHCA), would adversely impact access to adequate and affordable health insurance coverage for cancer patients and survivors.

On April 25, 2017, the text of an amendment to the American Health Care Act (AHCA) to be offered by Representative MacArthur (R-NJ) was released.  The amendment could undo several key protections that are critical for cancer patients and survivors – including the prohibition on pre-existing condition exclusions.

As Congress debates enacting changes to the health care market, one concept re-emerging is state high-risk pools to provide health insurance coverage for individuals who otherwise cannot obtain or afford coverage. High risk pools are not a new concept. Prior to the enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) many states operated some form of high risk pool. During implementation of the ACA, a federal high risk pool was established as an interim step to the new marketplaces. The overall success of high risk pools varied. This fact sheet examines how state risk pools work and the impact on persons with cancer and cancer survivors.

The current health care law has several provisions that help ensure children with cancer have access to quality treatment and care, and that survivors of childhood cancer are able to obtain and maintain affordable health insurance.  These provisions and protections are essential in any health coverage system that intends to provide meaningful care for pediatric cancer patients and survivors.

Much of the public debate regarding health care reform concerns government-funded health insurance like Medicaid and exchanges, but changing health care laws will also affect the health insurance many Americans get through their employers.  Therefore, any changes to current law must not make it harder for cancer patients and survivors to obtain, afford or use their job-based health insurance.