Access to Health Care

ACS CAN advocates for policies that provide access to treatments and services people with cancer need for their care - including those who may be newly diagnosed, in active treatment and cancer survivors.

Workforce Resources:

These comments submitted to the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Governance and Financing of Graduate Medical Education address ways to ensure an adequate and appropriate cancer care workforce to treat cancer patients.

Disparities Resources:

Hispanic/Latina women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer compared to other races/ethnicities. In 2015 approximately 2,000 Hispanic/Latina women in the U.S. were expected to be diagnosed with cervical cancer and 600 were expected to die from the disease. This factsheet discusses the cervical cancer health disparities found in Hispanic/Latina women and way to reduce this disparity.

 

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States. African American women have the highest death rate of all racial and ethnic groups, and are 42 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than white women. This factsheet discusses breast cancer disparities in African American women and solutions to help reduce this disparity. 

On November 10, 2015, ACS CAN hosted the first National Summit on Health Equity in St. Louis, Missouri.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are the foundation of our national  cancer research program and support research in every state. Today, that program is making remarkable progress in every area of discovery to improve cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and care.

Health Care Delivery Resources:

Approximately 160 provisions in the final health care legislation will directly impact the millions of Americans who have or will face cancer. The following is a list of the most important provisions for the cancer community:

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Medicaid Resources:

The U.S. Senate is currently considering the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) – legislation that could potentially jeopardize the Medicaid program. ACS CAN opposes the BCRA because it threatens access to Medicaid’s health care coverage for millions of lower income cancer patients, survivors, and those at risk for the disease.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver or Amendment gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

Medicaid is the health insurance safety-net program for lower income Americans. Currently, 64 million people – many of whom are cancer patients and survivors – rely on Medicaid for affordable health care coverage.

ACS CAN, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association released a joint statement providing principles for any entitlement reform proposal.

ACS CAN, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association released a joint statement in support of the Medicaid program, noting that any reforms should improve the value of care provided under the program and should not reduce access for Medicaid beneficiaries.

ACS CAN, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association released a joint statement providing principles for any entitlement reform proposal.